COVID-19 vaccine and other vaccines

All vaccines (except shingles vaccine) can be given at the same time or immediately before or after the COVID-19 vaccine.

On this page, you can find the following information:

Is it still important to have the flu vaccine?

Yes, it is still important to have the flu vaccine. The flu is a serious illness that causes hundreds of deaths each winter in New Zealand, and thousands of hospital admissions and doctor's visits.

Although the symptoms of COVID-19 and the flu can look similar, the two illnesses are caused by different viruses. The flu is caused by the influenza virus and COVID-19 is caused by the coronavirus.

As well as saving the lives of the more vulnerable members of our communities, improving our population's protection against the flu also improves our ability to manage any increased demand on health services as a result of COVID-19. Read more about the flu and the flu vaccine.

The flu vaccine can be given at the same time or immediately before or after the COVID-19 vaccine. If given at the same time, you will receive the vaccines at separate places on your arms and with different syringes. 

Can the COVID-19 vaccine be given with other vaccines?

All vaccines (except shingles vaccine) can be given at the same time or immediately before or after the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine and the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine.

These include:

If given at the same time, you will receive the vaccines at separate places on your arms and with different syringes. 

Ask your health provider if there are any vaccines that you may have missed or are due to have while you get your COVID-19 vaccine.

Note: Most of the dedicated COVID-19 vaccination centres (drive-through, mass vaccination sites or pop-up centres) do not have other vaccines available. Please ask your usual health provider (eg, GP, pharmacist or midwife) if there are any other vaccines you need.

If you are pregnant 

The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine and the influenza vaccine are safe at any stage of pregnancy. The whooping cough vaccine is recommended from 16 weeks gestation and these can be given at the same time as the COVID-19 vaccine or separately. 

Note: There is limited data on the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine in pregnant or breastfeeding people, so Pfizer remains the preferred choice of vaccine for this group. Read more about 
COVID-19 and pregnancy.

Why is there a 7-day gap between the COVID-19 vaccine and the shingles vaccine (Zostavax)?

A gap of 7 days is recommended between the COVID-19 vaccine and the shingles vaccine, Zostavax. This is to ensure a good immune response to each vaccine in older adults. There are no safety concerns should the gap between vaccines be less than the recommendations above. Do not delay getting your vaccination if such a gap is not possible.

Learn more

Spacing of vaccinations Immunisation Advisory Centre, NZ

Credits: Sandra Ponen, Pharmacist. Reviewed By: Maya Patel, MPharm PGDipClinPharm, Auckland Last reviewed: 04 Oct 2021