Speech Assistant AAC app

An app designed for people who have loss of speech but are able to read.

Speech Assistant AAC

By A-Soft

Speech assistant AAC icon
  • Alternative and augmented communication (AAC)

Clinical review

 

User reviews

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Available from

App website              iTunes           Google Play Store

Cost

  • Free for basic version in Google Play Store or $7.70 for full version
  • $9.99 in iTunes

What does the app do?

This app aims to support people who are speech impaired but are able to read, for example, after a stroke, vocal cord problems or autism. The app allows the user to create phrases or categories which are placed on buttons. With these buttons you can create messages that can be shown or spoken, using the voice installed on your device. The free version on Google play provides users with 6 categories of words (Phrases, Food/drink, Common, Verbs, Feelings, Body), and has basic features. The user is encouraged to upgrade to the paid version ($7.70) to access additional features. There is no free version available on iTunes - paid version only ($9.99).

Speech assistant AAC app screenshots

Pros

Cons

✔  Simple, easy-to-use  

✔  Many options for customisation such as button size, text size

✔  Users can create their own word categories and phrases in addition to ones already in app

✔  Users can share phrases/messages such as via email  
✘  The free version in Google Play Store has limited customisable features

✘  No free version available in iTunes - paid version only ($9.99)

✘  App does not detect duplicate words - for example, in the food/drink category, if the user stores the word tea, that is already present, there is no prompt to indicate that this word already exists

Review details

Date of review: February 2017
Platform reviewed: Android
App version: 5.0
Download size: 4.39 MB

Learn More

Furlong LM, Morris ME, Erickson S, Serry TA. Quality of Mobile Phone and Tablet Mobile Apps for Speech Sound Disorders: Protocol for an Evidence-Based Appraisal. JMIR Res Protoc. 2016 Nov 29;5(4).
Brunner TH, Kristyn DiFortuna KD, Michael LeTang ML et al. Using Technology to Give Patients a Voice After Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer. Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2016 Oct 1;20(5):474-6.
Credits: Editorial team. Last reviewed: 08 Mar 2017