Goal setting, problem solving and motivation apps

Goal setting is one of the best ways to help you make changes. It is a good skill to learn and can be used in many areas of your life, including when thinking about your health and wellness. When setting a goal and making an action plan, it’s important to choose something that you want to do. Make it easy on yourself and build up slowly. People who set small and realistic goals are more likely to achieve them and make long-term changes. The following apps have many features that can help you get started on setting goals, making changes and problem solving.

App  Features Clinical Review
Aunty Dee


  • Online tool
  • Problem solving
  • Aimed at Pacific and Maori young people aged 14-25 years
  • Cost: free
  • Available from Aunty website
  • Read more about Aunty Dee
SuperBetter

 
  • Goal setting
  • Self-monitoring
  • Self-reward
  • Gamification
  • Online community 
  • Available from Google Play and iTunes
  • Cost: free
  • Read more about SuperBetter
 

WOOP

 
  • Goal setting
  • Uses an evidence method called “mental contrasting with implementation intentions”
  • Available from Google Play and iTunes
  • Cost: free
  • Read more about WOOP



Happify


 
  • Goal setting
  • Follow different tracks based on your goals
  • Gamification
  • Reminders
  • Available from Google Play and iTunes
  • Paired website, can complete activities on all devices
  • Cost: free (basic), paid upgrade
  • Read more about Happify

Free version: 
Two out of five stars




Paid version:


Pacifica - stress & anxiety


 
  • Goal setting
  • Wellness tools such as mood and health habit tracking
  • Relaxation and coping activities
  • Available from Google Play and iTunes
  • Cost: free (basic), paid upgrade
  • Read more about Pacifica - stress & anxiety

Free version: 
Two out of five stars




Paid version:

Excluded apps Lantern app excluded because it requests credit card information upfront during sign-up, even before the user has had a chance to decide if the app is something they'd like to use.

References

  1. Bolier L, Haverman M, Westerhof GJ, Riper H, Smit F, Bohlmeijer E. Positive psychology interventions: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies. BMC Public Health. 2013 Feb 8;13:119.1.
  2. Carpenter J, Crutchley P, Zilca RD, Schwartz HA, Smith LK, Cobb AM, et al. Seeing the “Big” Picture: Big Data Methods for Exploring Relationships Between Usage, Language, and Outcome in Internet Intervention Data. Journal of Medical Internet Research. 2016;18(8):e241.
Credits: Editorial team. Last reviewed: 24 Apr 2018